MLAS 500.001 – The Human Condition
MLAS 520.001 – Environmental Literature and Media
ENG 520.001 – Creative Writing Seminar
MLAS 540.001 – Leadership for Organizational Transformation
MLAS 540.002 – Walking with Others: Global Health Challenges and Opportunities
MLAS 560.001 – The Development of Astronomy and Cosmology
CCS 560.001 – Seminar on Climate Change and Society: Decision Modeling & Statistics
CCS 571.001 – Special Topics in Climate Change and Society
MLAS 680.001 – Project Seminar
MLAS 680.002 – Project Seminar

MLAS 500.001 – The Human Condition

Instructor: John McClain, Ph.D (Humanities Faculty)
Wednesdays, 6pm – 8:30pm
3 graduate credit hours
033 Karpen Hall
CRN 60404

MLAS 500.001 is an introduction to interdisciplinary studies at the graduate level. This gateway seminar for the Master of Liberal Arts Program offers an opportunity to examine topics from a multitude of perspectives—intimate and immediate as well as analytical and more removed. Students will develop scholarly research, writing, and analytical thinking skills. This course must be taken as part of the first 9 hours of coursework in the MLAS program.

This semester MLAS 500 will focus on the "nature" of the human condition by exploring interpretations of human nature as found in literature and film. This is an interdisciplinary focus, with novels, short novels, plays, nonfiction, essays, poetry, and film adaptations of literary works (usually plays). The works' historical contexts will be emphasized, showing how "popular" culture can be "critical" culture, too. It is a thematic focus: most basically, how understandings (and misunderstandings?) of human nature inform views of various aspects of the human condition, political and social topics in particular: race and ethnicity; gender and sex; religious faith, secularism, and materialism; violence: crime and punishment. Life and Death.

Instructor John McClain: Ph.D. UNC Chapel Hill, 1993; M.A. UNC Chapel Hill 1986; B.A. UNC Asheville 1984. Instructor's fields: political theory and the history of political thought; political culture, meaning the "art" of selling political ideas and values in painting, architecture, film, literature, "propaganda."

 

MLAS 520.001 – Environmental Literature and Media

Instructor: Gerard Voos, Ph.D. (MLAS Core Faculty)
Thursdays, 6pm – 8:30pm
3 graduate credit hours
033 Karpen Hall
CRN 60405

Students will be provided an in-depth introduction into environmental literature through the reading of the works of writers such as: Henry Thoreau, Edward Abbey, Annie Dillard, Wendell Berry, and Aldo Leopold. These authors provide not only a sense of place in their writings, but also a message about the state of their world. The media portion of the course will be characterized by documentary and mainstream films, video clips, still photography, paintings, and other artistic media dealing with environmental and nature-related topics. As with the mentioned authors, representative media will range from a subtle portrayal of an environmental theme to explicit declarations of an appreciation for the natural world. Each class period will include a discussion of the week's reading assignment and presentation and discussion of environmental media in one or more of the forms listed above. Assignments will include two written assignments and one class presentation.

Instructor Gerard Voos: Gerard Voos is the Director of the Office of Graduate Studies, Continuing Education, and Sponsored Programs at UNC Asheville. He received his doctorate in soil ecology from the University of Rhode Island, a Master of Science degree in soil science from Colorado State University, and his B.S. in agronomy from the University of Kentucky. He also received a post-doctoral fellowship in biogeochemistry at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory in Aiken, SC. At UNC Asheville, he has taught Climate and Culture, A Sustainable Culture, Environmental Literature & Media, Consumerism and the Environment, Getting Grants: Basic Skills and Strategies, and World Agriculture in the MLAS program.

 

ENG 520.001 – Creative Writing Seminar

Only More So: An Advanced Creative Prose Workshop for MLAS Students

Instructor: Tommy Hays, MFA (MLAS Core Faculty)
Tuesdays, 6pm – 8:30pm
3 graduate credit hours
033 Karpen Hall
CRN 60403

This is a more intensive workshop for students who have already taken a creative writing class in the MLAS Program. Some students may have an ongoing project in mind, such as a collection of stories, a novel, personal essays, or memoir. Others may simply be interested in writing more rigorously, and we can plan your pieces as you go. A key part of this class will be workshopping, in which students read each other's work closely and respond thoughtfully and attentively. Workshop members will submit 15-20 pages of new work three times during the semester and revise two of those submissions. Also we will read the craft book The Making of a Story by Alice LaPlante, which covers fiction and creative nonfiction.

Instructor Tommy Hays: Tommy Hays' young adult novel, What I Came to Tell You, will be published in September and is excerpted in 27 Views of Asheville. His novel, The Pleasure Was Mine, finalist for the SIBA Fiction Award, has been chosen for numerous community reads, including the One City, One Book program in Greensboro and the Amazing Read in Greenville, SC. His other novels are Sam's Crossing, which has been recently re-released, and In the Family Way, winner of the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award. He has an essay in Literary Dogs & Their South Carolina Writers. He is Executive Director of the Great Smokies Writing Program and Lecturer in the Master of Liberal Arts Program at UNC Asheville. He teaches in the MFA Creative Writing Program at Murray State University and was the Sara Lura Matthews Self Writer-in-Residence at Converse College in January.

 

MLAS 540.001 – Leadership for Organizational Transformation

Instructor: Mary Lynn Manns, PhD
Mondays, 6pm – 8:30pm
3 graduate credit hours
033 Karpen Hall
CRN 60406

The course presents strategies for transforming organizations and other social structures. Students will work on cases based on authentic organizational situations by exploring, debating, and reflecting on the many possibilities for meeting the management challenges in leading change.

Instructor Mary Lynn Manns: Dr. Mary Lynn Manns is on the faculty in the Department of Management and Accountancy. She is the author of the book Fearless Change: Patterns for Introducing New Ideas. She has taught university classes and has done numerous presentations and consultations throughout the world on the topic of leading change, in organizations that include Microsoft, Avon, Proctor & Gamble, and amazon.com. Dr. Manns is working on her second book in leading change, due to be published in late 2013.

 

MLAS 540.002 – Walking with Others: Global Health Challenges and Opportunities

Instructor: Ameena Batada, DrPH (Health and Wellness Faculty)
Tuesdays, 6pm – 8:30pm
3 graduate credit hours
TBA Sherrill Center
CRN 60407

According to the U.S. Institute of Medicine, the United States of America is among the wealthiest nations in the world but far from the healthiest. The question of why Americans live shorter and less healthy lives than people in other high-income nations will launch this course's explorations of the nature, challenges, and opportunities in global health facing us today. We will investigate the major measures of health and the prevalence and causes of morbidity and mortality internationally. We will describe different types of health care systems and the roles of national and international policies and globalization in influencing population health. Ultimately, we will contemplate what it will take for the world's citizens to together reach optimal health, as the African proverb, "If you want to walk fast walk alone, if you want to walk far, walk together" implies. Course readings include research studies, reports by scientific and other organizations, books, and news media representing multiple perspectives. Class sessions involve exposure to media, discussions, group activities, and presentations. Students will research and present international case studies in this course.

Instructor Ameena Batada: Ameena Batada, DrPH, is an assistant professor in the Health and Wellness Department at the University of North Carolina Asheville. Dr. Batada has led exploratory and evaluation research on stress and coping among urban African American teens, communication programs to improve school health programs, and programs to improve child health knowledge and attitudes in India, among other projects. Dr. Batada also enjoys working directly with youth on participatory media for social change and is a proponent of community-based and participatory research and programming. Before joining UNCA, Dr. Batada was director of education, research, and outreach at Sesame Workshop India in New Delhi, and prior to that she worked at the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), advocating for limits on junk-food marketing to children and for national school nutrition standards. Dr. Batada holds a DrPH in health communication from the department of population and family health sciences at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, an MPH in maternal and child health with a certificate in international health from UNC Chapel Hill, and a BA in international studies from UNC Chapel Hill.

 

MLAS 560.001 – The Development of Astronomy and Cosmology

Instructor: Randy Booker, Ph.D. (Professor of Physics)
Mondays, 6pm – 8:30pm
3 graduate credit hours
005 Karpen Hall
CRN 60408

The course looks at the way science progresses through the lens of astronomy and cosmology. It shows the grand sweep of the development of this field from ancient times to modern times. We start by looking at the astronomy practiced by ancient cultures and the ancient Greeks. We then look at astronomy as practiced during the Middle Ages. Astronomy truly became a science during the Scientific Revolution, where we see the work of Galileo, Brahe, Kepler, and Newton. The Enlightenment's influence on both science and the American and French Revolutions are explored, as are the connections between science and a democratic society. We next see the influence the rise of other sciences, such as biology, chemistry, and geology, had on astronomy during the 1800's. We investigate 20th century ideas of relativity, particle physics, and quantum mechanics and see their impact on astronomy. Lastly, we consider modern cosmological theories of how the universe began and how it might end, while discussing black holes, dark matter, and dark energy. The course requires no pre-requisites of previous math or science courses. Math is rarely used in the course. There are two essay exams, a research paper, and a final oral presentation.

Instructor Randy Booker: Ph.D. Duke University, 1986; M.A. Duke University, 1983; B.A. Rice University, 1979. Randy Booker, Professor of Physics at UNC Asheville, served as Chair of the UNC Asheville Physics Department from 2000 to 2010. His doctoral work was in the measurement of the short-wavelength microwave spectra of molecules of importance to the interstellar medium of our galaxy and also those molecules serving as pollutants in the Earth's atmosphere. He has taught both undergraduate astronomy courses at UNC Asheville and courses in the Master of Liberal Arts Program since 1991. His research interests are in radio astronomy and the development of new environmentally-friendly energy sources.

 

CCS 560.001 - Seminar on Climate Change and Society: Decision Modeling & Statistics

Instructor: Steve Patch, Ph.D. (Professor of Mathematics)
Wednesdays, 6pm – 8:30pm
3 graduate credit hours
211 Rhoades Robinson Hall
CRN 60401

In this class we will examine how data can be used to help understand climate change. To be able to interpret the evidence in a statistical study of climate change it is important to consider methods of data collection and resulting data quality. Perhaps the most powerful tool for investigating the amount and causes of global temperature change is multiple regression. We will apply regression to existing temperature data with several potential predictor variables, paying close attention to required assumptionsto make the analysis valid. One of the most controversial aspects of climate change is how much the increase in global greenhouse gases impacts extreme events such as floods and droughts. We will use the statistical theory of extreme values to investigate whether floods and droughts are increasing as a result of human activities. Climate change will not affect all regions equally. We will look at how spatial statistics can be used to estimate local effects. In addition to applying the various statistical techniques, we will work on communicating the statistical results in a way that is technically correct but is understandable by a general audience.

Instructor Steve Patch: Dr. Steve Patch is a Professor in the Mathematics Department at UNCA. He received a B.A. in Mathematics from the University of Connecticut and a M.S. and Ph.D. from Clemson University. He has authored or co-authored more than 50 articles in peer reviewed journals, mostly on environmental issues.

 

CCS 571.001 - Special Topics in Climate Change and Society

Instructor: Steve Patch, Ph.D. (Professor of Mathematics)
Date TBA
1 graduate credit hour
Location: TBA
CRN 60402

This course is designed for students enrolling in CCS 560 who need to learn or review basic statistical techniques in order to be prepared to understand the more advanced techniques in that class. We will use an existing climate dataset to summarize numeric data and make inferences about a single mean and the difference between two means. We will also cover simple regression and multiple regression. Class will meet on the Saturday before the fall semester begins and the Saturday after the fall semester begins.

Instructor Steve Patch: Dr. Steve Patch is a Professor in the Mathematics Department at UNCA. He received a B.A. in Mathematics from the University of Connecticut and a M.S. and Ph.D. from Clemson University. He has authored or co-authored more than 50 articles in peer reviewed journals, mostly on environmental issues.

 

MLAS 680.001 – Project Seminar

Instructor: Holly Iglesias, Ph.D. (MLAS Core Faculty)
Tuesdays, 6pm – 8:30pm
3 graduate credit hours
206 Karpen Hall
CRN 60409

The second part of the capstone project, this course is a seminar dedicated to the completion of a scholarly research paper or creative project under the direction of a project advisor and the seminar instructor. Drafts are revised and final projects are presented in a public setting before the end of the semester. The final paper/project is approved by the instructor of 680, the MLAS Director, and the project advisor. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MLAS 670. (Grading S/U).

Instructor Holly Iglesias: Holly Iglesias holds a doctorate in Interdisciplinary Humanities from Florida State University and a Master of Arts in History from the University of Miami. She is the author of Angles of Approach (White Pine Press, 2010), Souvenirs of a Shrunken World (Kore Press, fall, 2008), and Boxing Inside the Box: Women's Prose Poetry (Quale Press, 2004), a critical study. She is a recipient of the National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Fellowship in Poetry and also received fellowships from the North Carolina Arts Council, the Massachusetts Cultural Council, and the Edward F. Albee Foundation. Her teaching interests include notions of race at the turn of the 20th century, documentary studies, and a creative/scholarly approach to history through poetry, archival photographs, and ephemera.

 

MLAS 680.002 – Project Seminar

Instructor: Holly Iglesias, Ph.D. (MLAS Core Faculty)
Wednesdays, 6pm – 8:30pm
3 graduate credit hours
206 Karpen Hall
CRN 60410

The second part of the capstone project, this course is a seminar dedicated to the completion of a scholarly research paper or creative project under the direction of a project advisor and the seminar instructor. Drafts are revised and final projects are presented in a public setting before the end of the semester. The final paper/project is approved by the instructor of 680, the MLAS Director, and the project advisor. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MLAS 670. (Grading S/U).

Instructor Holly Iglesias: Holly Iglesias holds a doctorate in Interdisciplinary Humanities from Florida State University and a Master of Arts in History from the University of Miami. She is the author of Angles of Approach (White Pine Press, 2010), Souvenirs of a Shrunken World (Kore Press, fall, 2008), and Boxing Inside the Box: Women's Prose Poetry (Quale Press, 2004), a critical study. She is a recipient of the National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Fellowship in Poetry and also received fellowships from the North Carolina Arts Council, the Massachusetts Cultural Council, and the Edward F. Albee Foundation. Her teaching interests include notions of race at the turn of the 20th century, documentary studies, and a creative/scholarly approach to history through poetry, archival photographs, and ephemera.