Fall 2014 Courses

Fall 2014 Courses

MLAS 500.001 – The Human Condition: Notions of Race at the Turn of the 20th Century 

Instructor: Holly Iglesias, Ph.D. (MLAS Core Faculty)
Wednesdays, 6 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
3 graduate credit hours
206 Karpen Hall
CRN 60347

The gateway seminar for the Master of Liberal Arts Program, MLAS 500 is an introduction to interdisciplinary studies at the graduate level. With a large, overarching theme—the human condition—the course offers an opportunity to examine any number of topics that address our fundamental human nature from a multitude of perspectives—intimate and immediate as well as analytical and more removed.

The topic, “Notions of Race," reflects the dreams and anxieties that crystalized at the cusp of the 20th century and continues to vex us to this day. The course examines how the assertion of white supremacy evolved from overt slavery to the social and legal constructs collectively known as Jim Crow. In addition, it considers how memory is linked to healing and the way storytelling shapes meaning. And last, it addresses two aspects of human nature that came to characterize the 20th century—the ability of the human spirit to endure in the face of violence and terror, and the capacity to rationalize and tolerate systems that deny the humanity of others.

Instructor Holly Iglesias:  Holly Iglesias earned a Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Humanities from Florida State University and an M.A. in History from the University of Miami. She is the author of four poetry collections—Angles of ApproachSouvenirs of a Shrunken WorldFruta Bomba, and Hands-on Saints—as well as a work of literary criticism, Boxing Inside the Box: Women's Prose Poetry. She has been awarded fellowships by the National Endowment for the Arts, the North Carolina Arts Council, the Massachusetts Cultural Council and the Edward F. Albee Foundation. Her teaching interests include documentary studies, racism at the turn of the 20th century, history through poetry, and ekphrastic poetry based on archival photographs and ephemera.

ENG 520.001 – The Discipline of "I": Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop

Instructor: Tommy Hays, M.F.A. (MLAS Core Faculty)
**moved to Thursdays, 6 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
3 graduate credit hours
033 Karpen Hall
CRN 60346

When we write about ourselves, whether childhood or adult experiences, we can’t simply say “I” and assume the reader conjures us and the world we know. We must look to craft to help us step back from “I” in order to write convincingly, to make our world accessible. We have to meet the reader on the common ground of the senses, embodying our memoirs or personal essays through fictional techniques such as narration, description, point of view, scene, dialogue, and detail. In this workshop, we will study published creative nonfiction forms and we’ll write our own pieces. We’ll do exercises, in-class and out, to help access those recent moments or distant memories we want to mine. If we work hard, we just might be lucky enough to run into that vaguely familiar stranger coming from the other direction, who, on second glance, is us.

The text we will be using is The Truth of the Matter by Dinty W. Moore.

Instructor Tommy Hays: Tommy Hays' young adult novel, What I Came to Tell You, was published in September and is excerpted in 27 Views of Asheville. His novel, The Pleasure Was Mine, finalist for the SIBA Fiction Award, has been chosen for numerous community reads, including the One City, One Book program in Greensboro and the Amazing Read in Greenville, SC. His other novels are Sam's Crossing, which has been recently re-released, and In the Family Way, winner of the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award. He has an essay in Literary Dogs & Their South Carolina Writers. He is Executive Director of the Great Smokies Writing Program and Lecturer in the Master of Liberal Arts Program at UNC Asheville. He teaches in the MFA Creative Writing Program at Murray State University and was the Sara Lura Matthews Self Writer-in-Residence at Converse College in January.

MLAS 540.001 – Consumerism & the Environment

Instructor: Gerard Voos, Ph.D. (MLAS Core Faculty)
Thursdays, 6 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
3 graduate credit hours
033 Karpen Hall
CRN 60348

During this course, we will explore through instructor- and student-led discussions, economic, natural resource, and cultural topics centered on consumerism and the environment. The issues will range from the clamor for constant world-wide economic growth, to the impacts of our increasing consumption of natural resources, to the belief that the more material goods we possess, the happier (as a society and individually) we will be. We will incorporate information from daily, weekly, and monthly periodicals as well as internet-based sources. I will assign several books, written on the above-mentioned and additional themes, at the start of the semester. From these, I will select a weekly reading to be discussed during each class. We will access additional resources (e.g., films, guest lecturers, field trips) as opportunities arise.

Instructor Gerard Voos: Gerard Voos is the Director of the Office of Graduate Studies, Continuing Education, and Sponsored Programs at UNC Asheville. He received his doctorate in soil ecology from the University of Rhode Island, a Master of Science degree in soil science from Colorado State University, and his B.S. in agronomy from the University of Kentucky. He also received a post-doctoral fellowship in biogeochemistry at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory in Aiken, SC. At UNC Asheville, he has taught Climate and Culture, A Sustainable Culture, Environmental Literature & Media, Consumerism and the Environment, Getting Grants: Basic Skills and Strategies, and World Agriculture in the MLAS program.

MLAS 560.001 – Do the Media Make Us Sick? An Exploration of the Intersection of Health, Mass Media & Society

Instructor: Ameena Batada, Ph.D.
Mondays, 6 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
3 graduate credit hours
402 Sherrill Center
CRN 60349

The mass media are often implicated in the development of social norms and attitudes leading to specific health behaviors and outcomes. In this course, we will explore the dimensions of health and wellness, the history and theories of mass media in the USA, media effects research methods, and concepts and scientific evidence on the impact of mass media on people's health. Types of media include primarily television, film, music, internet, news, and social media. Topics include health care portrayals, sex, violence, nutrition, aging, diverse relationships, media literacy, among others. We also will discuss the use of entertainment education, public service announcements, and other media approaches to promote good health. Course preparation includes reading research studies, reports, books, and popular articles, as well as viewing of films, television programs, and other media. Class sessions involve exposure to media, discussions, and presentations. Assignments include media content analyses, in-depth research on a related topic of interest, personal media use reflections, and production of "healthy" media.

Instructor Ameena Batada: Ameena Batada, DrPH, is an assistant professor in the Health and Wellness Department at the University of North Carolina  Asheville. Dr. Batada has led health communication design projects, formative and summative evaluation research of health programs, and programs, both in the USA and abroad. Dr. Batada also enjoys working directly with youth on participatory media for social change and is a proponent of community-based and participatory research and programming. Before joining UNCA, Dr. Batada was director of education, research, and outreach at Sesame Workshop India in New Delhi, and prior to that she worked at the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), advocating for limits on junk-food marketing to children and for national school nutrition standards. Dr. Batada holds a DrPH in health communication from the department of population and family health sciences at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, an MPH in maternal and child health with a certificate in international health from UNC Chapel Hill, and a BA in international studies from UNC Chapel Hill.

CCS 560.001 – Fundamentals of Climate Change Science

Instructor: Chris Hennon, Ph.D. 
**MONDAYS**(changed from Wed.), 6 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
3 graduate credit hours
238 Rhoades-Robinson Hall
CRN 60344

Foundational examination of how earth systems interact to cause regional and global climate change. Past climates will be studied to learn how feedbacks between the earth, atmosphere, biosphere, and cryosphere drive natural climate change. Predictions of future climates will be presented by means of theory, modern observations, and computer projections based on human activities.

This is a physics-based course. Participants will not be expected to have broad exposure to meteorology or climate studies. However, students should be comfortable with college-level algebra, basic physics, and scientific problem solving.

Instructor Chris Hennon: Dr. Christopher Hennon is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at UNC Asheville. He earned his doctorate in Atmospheric Sciences from The Ohio State University (2003), specializing in tropical cyclone prediction. His Master of Science degree, also in Atmospheric Science, was earned at Purdue University (1996). Dr. Hennon completed his undergraduate degree at Miami University (Ohio) in Aeronautics-Mathematics in 1994. After a 2-year post-doctoral research position at the National Hurricane Center in Miami, FL, Dr. Hennon joined the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at UNC Asheville in 2005. He has taught a variety of undergraduate courses, including Tropical Meteorology, Physical Climatology, Applied Climatology, and Atmospheric Dynamics. Although still active in the tropical cyclone research community, Dr. Hennon has also developed a strong interest in climate and climate change and is very excited to offer this graduate level course at UNC Asheville.

CCS 571.001 – Fundamentals of Climate Change Science Workshop Bootcamp

Instructor: Chris Hennon, Ph.D.
Saturday, August 23 and Satuday, August 30, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
1 graduate credit hour
Location: TBA
CRN 60345

This 1 credit-hour course is intended for those students who have limited backgrounds in mathematics, physics, and/or meteorology, or for those who may have taken these courses many moons ago or otherwise are feeling uncomfortable about the prospects of  what might happen to them the first couple of weeks in class. Topics include solving algebraic equations, scientific notation, exponents, atmospheric and climatological variables and their units, basic radiation, and various other fundamental meteorological concepts. 

Instructor Chris Hennon: Dr. Christopher Hennon is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at UNC Asheville. He earned his doctorate in Atmospheric Sciences from The Ohio State University (2003), specializing in tropical cyclone prediction. His Master of Science degree, also in Atmospheric Science, was earned at Purdue University (1996). Dr. Hennon completed his undergraduate degree at Miami University (Ohio) in Aeronautics-Mathematics in 1994. After a 2-year post-doctoral research position at the National Hurricane Center in Miami, FL, Dr. Hennon joined the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at UNC Asheville in 2005. He has taught a variety of undergraduate courses, including Tropical Meteorology, Physical Climatology, Applied Climatology, and Atmospheric Dynamics. Although still active in the tropical cyclone research community, Dr. Hennon has also developed a strong interest in climate and climate change and is very excited to offer this graduate level course at UNC Asheville.

MLAS 571-3, 671-3 – Special Topics in Master of Liberal Arts

1-3 credit hours

Course not otherwise included in the catalog listing but for which there may be special needs. May be repeated for credit as subject matter changes. See program director.

MLAS 610 – Tutorial

1-3 credit hours

Individual study supervised by a faculty member. Topics are chosen after consultation between student, graduate advisor, and faculty member. Course may be repeated as subject matter changes for a total of 6 hours of credit.

MLAS 680.001 – Project Seminar for Research Projects

Instructor: John McClain, Ph.D. (Humanities Faculty)
Tuesdays, 6 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
3 graduate credit hours
111 New Hall
CRN 60350

Prerequisite: Successful completion of 21 credit hours in the MLAS program.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MLAS 670.

The second part of the capstone project, this course is a seminar dedicated to the completion of a scholarly research paper under the direction of a project advisor and the seminar instructor. Drafts are revised and final projects are presented in a public setting before the end of the semester. The final paper/project is approved by the instructor of MLAS 680, the MLAS Director, and the project advisor. (Grading S/U). 

Instructor John McClain: Ph.D. UNC Chapel Hill, 1993; M.A. UNC Chapel Hill 1986; B.A. UNC Asheville 1984. Instructor's fields: political theory and the history of political thought; political culture, meaning the "art" of selling political ideas and values in painting, architecture, film, literature, "propaganda."

MLAS 680.002 – Project Seminar for Creative Projects

Instructor: Holly Iglesias, Ph.D. (MLAS Core Faculty)
Tuesdays, 6 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
3 graduate credit hours
206 Karpen Hall
CRN 60351

Prerequisite: Successful completion of 21 credit hours in the MLAS program.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of MLAS 670.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of 6 hours of graduate work in the project's medium.

The second part of the capstone process is a seminar dedicated to the completion of a creative project under the direction of a project advisor and the MLAS 680 instructor. Drafts are revised and edited into works worthy of publication or exhibition, which are presented in a public setting at the end of the semester. The final creative project is approved by the instructor of MLAS 680, the project advisor, and the MLAS Director. (Grading S/U).

Instructor Holly Iglesias: Holly Iglesias earned a Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Humanities from Florida State University and an M.A. in History from the University of Miami. She is the author of four poetry collections—Angles of ApproachSouvenirs of a Shrunken WorldFruta Bomba, and Hands-on Saints—as well as a work of literary criticism, Boxing Inside the Box: Women's Prose Poetry. She has been awarded fellowships by the National Endowment for the Arts, the North Carolina Arts Council, the Massachusetts Cultural Council and the Edward F. Albee Foundation. Her teaching interests include documentary studies, racism at the turn of the 20th century, history through poetry, and ekphrastic poetry based on archival photographs and ephemera.