MLAS 500.001 - Seminar on the Human Condition

Registration Call Number: 10975
Instructor: John McClain, Ph.D (Humanities Faculty)
Mondays, 6:00-8:30pm
3 graduate credit hours
Location: TBA

An introduction to interdisciplinary studies at the graduate level, this gateway seminar for the Master of Liberal Arts Program offers an opportunity to examine topics that address our fundamental human nature from a multitude of perspectives—intimate and immediate as well as analytical and more removed. Students will develop scholarly research, writing, and analytical thinking skills. Must be taken as part of the first 9 hours of coursework in the MLAS program.

This semester of MLAS 500 will focus on the "nature" of the human condition: exploring human nature with literary classics. It is an interdisciplinary focus with novels, short novels, plays, poetry, and film adaptations. The works’ historical contexts will be emphasized, showing how “popular” culture can be “critical“ culture, too. It is a thematic focus: most basically, how understandings (and misunderstandings?) of human nature inform views of various political topics, broadly understood: race and ethnicity, gender and sex; religious faith, secularism, and materialism; violence: crime and punishment. Life and Death. How do cultural classics, in this case literary classics, narrate these relationships? What are their “agendas” regarding these relationships?

Instructor John McClain:  Ph.D. UNC Chapel Hill, 1993; M.A. UNC Chapel Hill 1986; B.A. UNC Asheville 1984. Instructor’s fields: political theory and the history of political thought; political culture, the "art" of selling political ideas and values in painting, architecture, film, literature, “propaganda.”

ENG 520.001 - Locating Our Stories: A Creative Prose Workshop on Place

Registration Call Number: 10976
Instructor: Tommy Hays, MFA (MLAS Core Faculty)
Tuesdays, 6:00-8:30pm
3 graduate credit hours
Location: TBA

Student writers often overlook their own personal landscapes.  They don’t think of the places they know or have known as especially compelling or they believe that by writing too specifically about those places they’ll lose the reader’s interest or they think of place as something apart from story like plywood sets carted on and off a stage. In this class we will explore place as an essential, inextricable part of storymaking. We will learn to think about place as not just backdrop or setting but as embodied emotional terrain. Looked at in the right light, place can become an essential source leading us to our stories and deepening our revisions.  In this class we will study published fiction and creative nonfiction informed by place.  We’ll do exercises in class and out to help us discover our own short stories and personal essays shaped by the landscapes we carry within us.

Instructor Tommy Hays: Tommy Hays' novel, The Pleasure Was Mine,has been chosen for numerous community reads, including the One City, One Book program in Greensboro and the Amazing Read--Greenville, SC's first community read. Read on NPR's "Radio Reader", it was a Finalist for the SIBA Fiction Award. His other novels are Sam's Crossing and In the Family Way, winner of the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award. What I Came to Tell You, a young adult novel, will be published in the fall of 2013 and is excerpted in 27 Views of Asheville. He has an essay in the forthcoming Literary Dogs & Their South Carolina Writers. He is Executive Director of the Great Smokies Writing Program and Lecturer in the MLAS at UNC Asheville. He teaches in the MFA Creative Writing Program at Murray State University and will be the Sara Lura Matthews Self Writer-in-Residence at Converse College in January.

 

ENG 520.002 - Graphic Memoir: Surviving Life

Registration Call Number: 10977
Instructor: Katherine Min (Literature/Language Faculty)
Tuesdays, 6:00-8:30pm
3 graduate credit hours
Location: TBA

This course will take an in-depth look at a number of graphic memoirs, including classics of the genre, Maus, Persepolis, and Fun Home. Graphic memoirs tell increasingly sophisticated stories, as effective at encapsulating whole societies at the edge of the abyss—war-torn Lebanon, the Warsaw ghetto, Iran under the Ayotollah—as they are at capturing the more intimate and individualized heartbreak of ordinary life. Using Scott McCloud’s comprehensive Understanding Comics, as a guide, we will examine the art of the graphic memoir format—the interplay among textual, visual, and design elements, to create a narrative that is truly bigger than the sum of its parts.

Instructor Katherine Min: Katherine Min has been teaching creative writing and literature in UNCA’s Department of Literature & Language, since the fall of 2007. She holds a B.A. in English literature, from Amherst College, and a M.S. in Journalism, from Columbia University’s School of Journalism. Her novel Secondhand World, was published by Alfred A. Knopf, in 2006.  She was a finalist for the PEN/Bingham Award in 2007 for “an exceptionally talented writer whose debut work represents distinguished literary achievement and suggests great promise.” Min’s stories have appeared in numerous publications, including TriQuarterly, Ploughshares, The Threepenny Review, and Prairie Schooner, and have been widely anthologized in college textbooks.  She is the 2012 recipient of a Sherwood Anderson Foundation Fiction Award, and has also been awarded a National Endowment for the Arts grant, a North Carolina State Arts Council Award, a Pushcart Prize, and two New Hampshire State Arts Council Fellowships. Her teaching interests include Asian American literature, fiction, creative nonfiction, graphic novels, murder, and the novel.

 

MLAS 540.001 - Cultivating Food Justice: Food Politics & Nutrition Policy

Registration Call Number: 10978
Instructor: Amy Lanou, Ph.D. (Health and Wellness Faculty)
Wednesdays, 6:00-8:30pm
3 graduate credit hours
Location: TBA

Cultivating food justice explores contemporary issues around defining, developing, implementing, and sustaining a just food system at the community, national, and to some degree global level. In this course, we will look at the intersections of food and nutrition policy with human rights, ethics, food security, dietary pattern-related illness, poverty, and consumer choice. We will explore how corporate, government, community and consumer interests impact nutrition, food and health policy and how individuals and organization can influence nutrition and health policy to promote consumer health. Specifically we will address how North American food policy (food labeling and advertising laws, the dietary guidelines, the National School Lunch Program, organic standards, the Farm Bill, etc.) were established and how these policies are modified and can be influenced to move towards a just food system. We will investigate community organizing and policy change efforts that are reaping success and formulate a plan of action for cultivating food justice in a community of interest.

Instructor Amy Lanou: Amy Joy Lanou, PhD, is an associate professor in the Health and Wellness Department at the University of North Carolina at Asheville. Dr. Lanou is a nutritionist by training and her current research interests include nutrition for the prevention of chronic disease, how self-efficacy impacts health behaviors, influencing food and nutrition policy, and nutrition and bone health.She is the co-author of Building Bone Vitality (McGraw-Hill; June 2009) and Healthy Eating for Life for Children (John Wiley & Sons, Inc.; Feb. 2002). Dr. Lanou formerly served as nutrition director at Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine overseeing nutrition education and outreach programs and advocating for healthier diets. She has worked with T. Colin Campbell, Ph.D., at Cornell University as a nutrition writer and was managing editor of his newsletter and online journal, New Century Nutrition.

 

CCS 560.001 - Tools for Climate Change Information and Decision–Making

Registration Call Number: 10974
Instructor: J. Derek Morgan, Ph.D. (NEMAC)
Mondays, 6:00-8:30pm
3 graduate credit hours
Location: Karpen Hall 038

This course surveys the tools that are used to visualize, explore and analyze data within the context of global climate change. Central to this course is the use of graphing packages and geographic information systems (GIS) for climate change decision-making; and exploring simulation and group facilitation tools for decision making and analysis of climate change impacts. Prerequisite: familiarity with Windows computers and Microsoft Office tools.

Instructor John Derek Morgan:  Derek has taught both technical GIS courses (GIS Customization and Computer Cartography) and World Regional Geography. While he greatly enjoys both teaching and researching, he also has over 13 years of professional information technology (including GIS) experience in large academic, corporate, and governmental industry settings.

Derek holds a B.A. in Economics with a minor in Applied Computer Science and a Masters in Information Science from the University of Central Florida, and a Ph.D. in Geography from Florida State University.

 

MLAS 560.001 - The Science of Decision Making: Postive Psychology & the Brain

Registration Call Number: 10979
Instructor: Michael Neelon, Ph.D. (Psychology Faculty)
Wednesdays, 6:00-8:30pm
3 graduate credit hours
Location: Karpen Hall 033

How do we make decisions? What is the role of emotions in decision making? Can we ever be happy? This course will explore the science of decision-making to address such questions. To understand the mental machinery behind decisions, we will read from a variety of disciplines including economics, experimental & positive psychology, and neuroscience. Finally, we will discuss how this work impacts our daily lives in a variety of ways. While no pre-requisite knowledge will be assumed, biological and mathematical material will be covered in the readings.

Instructor Michael Neelon: Michael Neelon, Assistant Professor of Psychology at UNC Asheville, received his doctorate from the University of Wisconsin in experimental psychology where he studied dynamic auditory perception and multimodal selective attention. He then completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Wisconsin Hospital investigating the effects of selective attention on neural responses recorded directly from human auditory cortex. Since arriving at UNC Asheville, his teaching has focused on the relationship between brain and behavior.

MLAS 571.001 (Special Topics) - Neuropsychology & Savantism

Registration Call Number: 11095
Instructor: Michael Neelon, Ph.D. (Psychology Faculty)
Tuesdays, 5:00-5:50pm
1 graduate credit hour
Location: Karpen Hall 033

This course will explore how the brain produces thought and perception using neuropsychological case studies and personal accounts.  Neuropsychology seeks to describe the relationship between the brain and the mind by detailing how damage to particular brain areas leads to particular behavioral or mental deficits.  We will primarily read famous case studies and 1st-person stories of individuals suffering from brain damage in order to “peak behind the curtain” of thought and perception.  Time pending, we will also explore how the brain adapts to damage, sometimes to the point of producing unusual surfeits of ability known as savantism.  While no pre-requisite knowledge will be assumed, students will be asked to review basic brain anatomy and function as part of this course.

Instructor Michael Neelon: Michael Neelon, Assistant Professor of Psychology at UNC Asheville, received his doctorate from the University of Wisconsin in experimental psychology where he studied dynamic auditory perception and multimodal selective attention. He then completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Wisconsin Hospital investigating the effects of selective attention on neural responses recorded directly from human auditory cortex. Since arriving at UNC Asheville, his teaching has focused on the relationship between brain and behavior.

MLAS 560.002 - World Agriculture

Registration Call Number: 11186
Instructor: Gerard Voos, Ph.D. (MLAS Core Faculty)
Thursdays, 6:00-8:30pm
3 graduate credit hours
Location: Karpen Hall 033

We will discuss the current global food system, its positives and negatives, and outline the future demands on agriculture to be made by a growing global population. We will also cover basic soil and crop science concepts, food sovereignty and security issues, fair trade, and alternative methods for producing food (vertical agriculture, aquaculture, etc.).

Instructor Gerard Voos: Gerard Voos is the Director of the Office of Graduate Studies, Continuing Education, and Sponsored Programs, and serves as the Chief Research Officer at the University of North Carolina Asheville. He received his doctorate in soil ecology from the University of Rhode Island, a Master of Science degree in soil science from Colorado State University, and his Bachelor of Science in agronomy from the University of Kentucky. He also received a post-doctoral fellowship in biogeochemistry at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory in Aiken, South Carolina. At UNC Asheville, he has taught Climate and Society, A Sustainable Culture, Consumerism and the Environment, and Environmental Literature & Media in the Master of Liberal Arts program; and Environmental Literature, and Energy and Society to undergraduates in the Environmental Studies Department. Dr. Voos was part of the group of faculty and administrators that developed the Climate Change and Society curriculum offered by North Carolina State University, and that is included in the MLAS program's Climate Change and Society certificate curriculum. Dr. Voos is professionally and personally interested in sustainability issues. In addition to publishing and presenting research findings, he also has published general interest articles in web, trade and regional publications on subjects ranging from wine, fox hunting, golf and the Vietnam War. In his free time, he enjoys hiking, camping, and motorcycling.

MLAS 670 - Scholarly Inquiry Seminar

Please note: there will be two sections of MLAS 670 this semester. One section will meet on Tuesday evenings, the other on Wednesday evenings. Both will be taught by Holly Iglesias and will have the same content and structure. Please see below for CRNs for each section.

MLAS 670.002
Registration Call Number: (CRN) 10982
Instructor: Holly Iglesias, Ph.D. (MLAS Core Faculty)
Tuesdays, 6:00-8:30pm
3 graduate credit hours
Location: TBA

 Prerequisite: Successful completion of 21 credit hours in the MLAS Program

MLAS 670.001
Registration Call Number: (CRN) 10981
Instructor: Holly Iglesias, Ph.D. (MLAS Core Faculty)
Wednesdays, 6:00-8:30pm
3 graduate credit hours
Location: TBA

Prerequisite: Successful completion of 21 credit hours in the MLAS Program

 

MLAS 670 is the first of two capstone requirements for the Master of Liberal Arts degree, which together provide the basis for identification, development, and completion of a major scholarly/creative project. Each project must be developed through individual, independent research and through knowledge gained in previous interdisciplinary seminars.

In MLAS 670 students will (1) hone an appropriate project topic; (2) survey techniques of critical inquiry; (3) successfully complete a prospectus and scholarly bibliography; and (4) select a project content advisor to oversee the work to be completed in MLAS 680. Grading: S/U.

Instructor Holly Iglesias: Holly Iglesias earned a doctorate in Interdisciplinary Humanities from Florida State University and an Master of Arts in History from the University of Miami. She is the author of "Souvenirs of a Shrunken World" (Kore Press, fall, 2008), a poetry collection, and "Boxing Inside the Box: Women’s Prose Poetry" (Quale Press, 2004), a critical study. "Angles of Approach," another poetry collection, will be published by White Pine Press in the fall of 2010. She is a 2011 recipient of the National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Fellowship in Poetry and has been the recipient of fellowships from the North Carolina Arts Council, the Massachusetts Cultural Council and the Edward F. Albee Foundation. Her teaching interests include American studies, documentary studies and a creative/scholarly approach to history through poetry and to poetry through archival photographs and ephemera.