Spring 2015 Courses

Course Archives

MLAS 500.001 – The Human Condition
ENG 520.001 – Locating Our Stories: A Creative Prose Workshop on Place
MLAS 520.001 - Images of Upheaval: Social Documentary Photography in America
MLAS 540.001 – Environmental Law
CCS 560.001 – Tools for Climate Change Information and Decision Making
MLAS 571-3, 671-3 – Special Topics in Master of Liberal Arts
CCS/ENG/MLAS 599 - Directed Research in Climate Change & Society, English, or MLAS (1-3 credits)
MLAS 610 – Tutorial
MLAS 670.001 – Scholarly Inquiry Seminar for Research Projects
MLAS 670.002 – Scholarly Inquiry Seminar for Creative Projects

MLAS 500.001 – The Human Condition

Instructor: Sam Kaplan, Ph.D. (Mathematics Faculty)
Thursdays, 6 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
3 graduate credit hours
210 Rhoades/Robinson Hall
CRN 10436

The gateway seminar for the Master of Liberal Arts Program, MLAS 500 is an introduction to interdisciplinary studies at the graduate level. With a large, overarching theme—the human condition—the course offers an opportunity to examine any number of topics that address our fundamental human nature from a multitude of perspectives—intimate and immediate as well as analytical and more removed.  Students will develop scholarly research, writing, and analytical thinking skills.  Must be taken as part of the first nine hours of coursework in the MLAS Program.  Exceptions must be approved by the Director.

Instructor Sam Kaplan:  B.S., 1990, University of North Carolina; M.A., 1992, Boston University; Ph.D., 1996, Boston University.  In their end-of-semester evaluations, UNC Asheville students consistently praise mathematics profesor Sam Kaplan for his ability to explain difficult material, his enthusiasm, and the way in which he organizes each course. In addition to lectures, he engages students in group work and oral presentations. By providing students with a variety of tools and immersing them in different settings to solve problems, he is able to effectively reach a broad range of skill levels. A recipient of the UNC system's Award for Excellence in Teaching, Kaplan also has devoted time to creating and launching the Asheville Initiative in Mathematics (AIM), a program that connects UNC Asheville's Mathematics Department with local communities.

 

ENG 520.001 – Locating Our Stories: A Creative Prose Workshop on Place

Instructor: Tommy Hays, M.F.A. (MLAS Core Faculty)
Tuesdays, 6 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
3 graduate credit hours
033 Karpen Hall
CRN 10435

Student writers often overlook their own personal landscapes.  They don’t think of the places they know or have known as especially compelling or they believe that by writing too specifically about those places they’ll lose the reader’s interest or they think of place as something apart from story like plywood sets carted on and off a stage. In this class we will explore place as an essential, inextricable part of storymaking. We will learn to think about place as not just backdrop or setting but as embodied emotional terrain. Looked at in the right light, place can become an essential source leading us to our stories and deepening our revisions.  In this class we will study published fiction and creative nonfiction informed by place.  We’ll do exercises in class and out to help us discover our own short stories and personal essays shaped by the landscapes we carry within us.

Instructor Tommy Hays: Tommy Hays’s first middle grade novel, What I Came to Tell You, now out in paperback, was chosen as a Fall 2013 Okra Pick by the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance (SIBA), was selected for the 2014 SIBA Book Award Long List as well as for the American Booksellers 2014 ABC Best Books for Children Catalog. His novel, The Pleasure Was Mine, was a Finalist for the SIBA Fiction Award in 2006, and has been chosen for numerous community reads. His other novels are Sam’s Crossing, and In the Family Way, winner of the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award. He is Executive Director of the Great Smokies Writing Program and Core Faculty in the MLAS program at UNC Asheville. He teaches in the MFA Creative Writing Program at Murray State University. A member of the National Book Critics Circle, he received his BA in English from Furman University and graduated from the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College.

MLAS 520.001 – Images of Upheaval: Social Documentary Photography in America

Instructor: Holly Iglesias, Ph.D. (MLAS Core Faculty)
**MOVED TO WEDNESDAYS, 6 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
3 graduate credit hours
206 Karpen Hall
CRN 10437

The course examines the confluence of two major influences on the character of the 20th century in the United States—technology (advances in photography and filmmaking fueling the growth of mass media) and social unrest (racism, immigration, cycles of economic boom and bust). Because visual imagery proliferated in tandem with social upheaval, photography and film were soon enlisted as instruments of social change. Two powerful examples of this were developed during the Great Depression—the federal Farm Security Administration's photography project and the publication of LIFE, the first mass-circulation, large-format magazine.  Over the course of several decades, each helped "to show Americans to America," and in the process, gaining support for poverty relief programs, the war effort and civil rights activism.

Instructor Holly Iglesias: Holly Iglesias earned a doctorate in Interdisciplinary Humanities from Florida State University and a master's degree History from the University of Miami. She is the author of two poetry collections—Souvenirs of a Shrunken World and Angles of Approach—and of Boxing Inside the Box: Women's Prose Poetry, a work of literary criticism. She has been awarded fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the North Carolina Arts Council, the Massachusetts Cultural Council, and the Edward Albee Foundation. Her teaching interests include documentary film and photography, archival poetry, and the changing notions of citizenship and race in the U.S. at the turn of the 20th century.
 

MLAS 540.001 – Environmental Law

Instructor: John Noor, JD (Visiting Faculty)
Mondays, 6 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
3 graduate credit hours
033 Karpen Hall
CRN 10438

This course focuses on how legal institutions have been used to respond to environmental problems.  This seminar course will provide you with a broad and practical understanding of the important federal, state, and local regulations commonly referred to as "environmental law."  You will be introduced to a variety of environmental challenges addressed by environmental law, the difficult policy issues surrounding environmental issues, and the legal complexities that accompany environmental: regulation, compliance, and litigation.

This course will address "core" environmental laws and regulations while developing practical analysis and research skills that are transferable to real world applications and other areas of environmental law.  Specifically, the course will cover: the common law foundations of environmental law; the social, environmental, and economic factors that inform environmental policy; the rulemaking process (the public process for adopting all types of administrative regulation); the Clean Water Act; the Clean Air Act; the Endangered Species Act; and state, federal, and international attempts to address climate change.  The course will be interactive and attempt to impart the above-listed topics through the context of real-world events occurring here in western North Carolina. 
 

Instructor John Noor: John is a litigation attorney focusing on environmental law, complex business litigation, governmental affairs, and public policy. John joined Roberts & Stevens law firm in 2013, after serving for two years as a law clerk to the Honorable Calvin E. Murphy on the North Carolina Business Court. Prior to his clerkship, John was a summer clerk to the Honorable Robert C. Hunter, Jr. on the North Carolina Court of Appeals and, before attending law school, worked for UNC President Erskine Bowles.  Education: University of North Carolina at Asheville, BA in Political Science and Economics, Distinction in Political Science, 2007; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, JD with honors, 2011.

 

CCS 560.001 – Tools for Climate Change Information and Decision Making

Instructor: J. Derek Morgan, Ph.D. (Senoir Research Scientist, NEMAC)
Tuesdays, 6 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
3 graduate credit hours
036 Karpen Hall
CRN 10434

This course surveys the tools that are used to visualize, explore and analyze data within the context of climate change and society. Specifically, students in this course will get hands-on experience with statistical computing/graphics and geographic information systems (GIS). While working with these tools students will contextualize how these tools can be used to facilitating climate change decision-making. Prerequisite: familiarity with Windows and/or Macintosh computers and a willingness to learn about new tools that run on these operating systems.

Instructor John Derek Morgan:  Derek joined the NEMAC team in October 2011 as Applied Research Software Designer. He has a strong research interest in developing novel geographic information systems (GIS) solutions to emerging challenges at the environment/society interface. Derek has taught multiple sections of World Regional Geography, Computer Cartography and GIS Programming. He also has over fifteen years of professional information technology (including GIS) experience in both large academic, corporate and governmental industry settings. Derek holds a B.A. in Economics with a minor in Applied Computer Science and a Masters in Information Science from the University of Central Florida, and a Ph.D. in Geography from Florida State University.

MLAS 571-3, 671-3 – Special Topics in Master of Liberal Arts & Sciences

1-3 credit hours

Course not otherwise included in the catalog listing but for which there may be special needs. May be repeated for credit as subject matter changes. See program director.

CCS/ENG/MLAS 599 – Directed Readings in Climate Change & Society, English, or Master of Liberal Arts & Sciences

Independent research under the supervision of a faculty mentor or with an interdisciplinary team of faculty.  An IP grade may be awarded at the discretion of the instructor.  Students may take Directed Research twice for a total of 6 hours of credit, in any combination of CCS 599, ENG 599, and MLAS 599.  Contact Program Office regarding registration paperwork and topic approval.

MLAS 610 – Tutorial

1-3 credit hours

Individual study supervised by a faculty member. Topics are chosen after consultation between student, graduate advisor, and faculty member. Course may be repeated as subject matter changes for a total of 6 hours of credit.

 

MLAS 670.001 – Scholarly Inquiry Seminar for Creative Projects

Instructor: Holly Iglesias, Ph.D. (MLAS Core Faculty)
**MOVED TO THURSDAYS, 6 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
3 graduate credit hours
206 Karpen Hall
CRN 10439


Prerequisite: Successful completion of 21 credit hours in the MLAS program with 6 hours of graduate work in the creative project's medium.
*Note, students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 to graduate. Because MLAS 670/680 are pass/fail, they do not contribute to the GPA.

This is the first of two capstone requirements for the Master of Liberal Arts degree, which together provide the basis for the development and revision of a major creative project (in film, fine arts, creative writing, etc.). Students will prepare a prospectus that demonstrates appropriate preparation for such a project; significant influences on their work; and critical perspective on the tradition(s) of their chosen genre or medium. In addition, a faculty advisor will be chosen to oversee the work, which will be drafted over the summer, and revised/refined in the fall in MLAS 680. Grading: S/U.

Instructor Holly Iglesias: Holly Iglesias earned a doctorate in Interdisciplinary Humanities from Florida State University and a master's degree History from the University of Miami. She is the author of two poetry collections—Souvenirs of a Shrunken World and Angles of Approach—and of Boxing Inside the Box: Women's Prose Poetry, a work of literary criticism. She has been awarded fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the North Carolina Arts Council, the Massachusetts Cultural Council, and the Edward Albee Foundation. Her teaching interests include documentary film and photography, archival poetry, and the changing notions of citizenship and race in the U.S. at the turn of the 20th century.

 

MLAS 670.002 – Scholarly Inquiry Seminar for Research Projects

Instructor: Gerard Voos, Ph.D. (MLAS Core Faculty)
**MOVED TO THURSDAYS, 6 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
3 graduate credit hours
302A Owen Hall
CRN 60351

Prerequisite: Successful completion of 21 credit hours in the MLAS program.

MLAS 670 is the first of two capstone requirements for the Master of Liberal Arts degree, which together provide the basis for identification, development, and completion of a major scholarly project. Each project must be developed through individual, independent research and through knowledge gained in previous interdisciplinary seminars. In MLAS 670 students will: (1) hone an appropriate project topic; (2) select a project content advisor to oversee the work to be completed in MLAS 680; (3) survey techniques of critical inquiry; and (4) successfully complete a prospectus and scholarly bibliography . The texts we will use are: Stylish Academic Writing, by Helen Sword, and The Craft of Research, by Booth, Colomb, and Williams. Grading: S/U.

Instructor Gerard Voos: Gerard Voos is the Director of the Office of Graduate Studies, Continuing Education, and Sponsored Programs at UNC Asheville. He received his doctorate in soil ecology from the University of Rhode Island, a Master of Science degree in soil science from Colorado State University, and his B.S. in agronomy from the University of Kentucky. He also received a post-doctoral fellowship in biogeochemistry at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory in Aiken, SC. At UNC Asheville, he has taught Climate and Culture, A Sustainable Culture, Environmental Literature & Media, Consumerism and the Environment, Getting Grants: Basic Skills and Strategies, and World Agriculture in the MLAS program.